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test video post – neural interfacing

test video post – neural interfacing



The recent explosion in development of micro/nanotechnologies is increasingly providing opportunities to use devices to investigate and/or aid neurological functionality. Neural interfaces link the nervous system to internal or external devices – creating possibilities for bi-directional information exchange, (and its correction), between different areas of the nervous system (normally through a device) – thereby recording, stimulating, restoring or supplementing neurological functionality. For example, Brain Computer Interfacing (BCI) is a promising technology that can potentially help return lost motor and sensory function to individuals suffering from debilitating injuries to the nervous system.

A key component of BCIs are intracortical neural interfaces (INIs), which can provide the quality of neural signals required to control an external prosthesis such as a robotic arm. In reality, however, the robust foreign body response and blood-brain barrier breach caused by indwelling neural interfaces causes degradation of signal quality, and chronic device failure: material and structural incompatible with brain tissue, make INIs incapable of functioning chronically. Our work in this field aims at designing neurointegrative intracortical neural interfacing systems, and to develop non-invasive implantation strategies, to help reduce the foreign body response to the indwelling INIs and consequential chronic failure.

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video test with youtube link

The recent explosion in development of micro/nanotechnologies is increasingly providing opportunities to use devices to investigate and/or aid neurological functionality. Neural interfaces link the nervous system to internal or external devices – creating possibilities for bi-directional information exchange, (and its correction), between different areas of the nervous system (normally through a device) – thereby recording, stimulating, restoring or supplementing neurological functionality. For example, Brain Computer Interfacing (BCI) is a promising technology that can potentially help return lost motor and sensory function to individuals suffering from debilitating injuries to the nervous system.

A key component of BCIs are intracortical neural interfaces (INIs), which can provide the quality of neural signals required to control an external prosthesis such as a robotic arm. In reality, however, the robust foreign body response and blood-brain barrier breach caused by indwelling neural interfaces causes degradation of signal quality, and chronic device failure: material and structural incompatible with brain tissue, make INIs incapable of functioning chronically. Our work in this field aims at designing neurointegrative intracortical neural interfacing systems, and to develop non-invasive implantation strategies, to help reduce the foreign body response to the indwelling INIs and consequential chronic failure.

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Welcome

Welcome

Injuries to the central and the peripheral nervous systems have devastating long-term consequences. Individuals suffering from these debilitating injuries experience severe functional deficits, and poor prognosis as a result of the limited treatment options currently available. Research in the Translational Glycomaterials Laboratory (TglycoL) lies at the interface of biology and engineering, and uses an interdisciplinary approach to develop clinically translatable strategies that can help trigger the endogenous regenerative cascade, and facilitate functional recovery following traumatic insults to the nervous system. Specifically, we employ both natural and synthetically derived glycomaterials for the treatment of nervous system injuries; and for the development of neurointegrative coatings for neural interfacing applications.

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Research

Research

Carbohydrates are an important and often underappreciated class of biological macromolecules that play important roles in development, and in repair and regeneration post-injury. Defects in carbohydrate biosynthesis and alterations in carbohydrate composition are known to result in severe developmental defects, cartilage breakdown and reduced myocardial tissue integrity. Sugars also play important roles in a number of biological processes, a few of which include: binding trophic factors and cytokines, controlling stem cell differentiation, cell fate and self-renewal, directing neuronal path-finding, and protecting and stabilizing proteins. While bio-compatible synthetic polymer and peptide based biomaterials have gained widespread acceptance for regenerative medicine applications, the potential of sugar based biomaterials has not been fully explored. My research integrates methodologies from engineering disciplines and biology, to: a) Gain a fundamental understanding of the role of carbohydrates associated with “scar tissue” surrounding injuries to the nervous system; and b) Devise strategies to rationally design “glycoengineered” therapeutic interventions that can ultimately be tested in clinically relevant models.

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CNS Injuries

CNS Injuries

DEVELOPING STRATEGIES TO BRIDGE CNS DEFICITS

The annual incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) amounts to approximately 1.7 million new cases each year in The United States. Trauma to the CNS leads to irreversible neural damage and loss of function that can be devastating to a person’s quality of life. Unfortunately, the multifaceted nature of CNS trauma makes targeted therapeutic application difficult, and current strategies to bridge CNS deficits are limited in their ability to effectuate long-term repair, and facilitate functional recovery.  In efforts to address these limitations, we are developing multi-functional biomimetic glycomaterials for stem cell transplantation, and trophic factor enrichment after moderate TBI.

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PNS Injuries

PNS Injuries

DEVELOPING STRATEGIES TO BRIDGE PERIPHERAL NERVE DEFICITS

Injuries to the peripheral nervous system (PNS) can lead to significant loss of motor and sensory functions. Currently, the most widely used method for the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries is autologous (self) nerve transplants, which involve sacrificing nerves from elsewhere within the patient. This treatment is greatly limited by the scarcity of nerves within the patient. We are currently developing nerve guidance conduits capable of facilitating peripheral nerve regeneration, and promoting functional recovery in a challenging nerve gap.

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Neural Interfacing

Neural Interfacing

The recent explosion in development of micro/nanotechnologies is increasingly providing opportunities to use devices to investigate and/or aid neurological functionality. Neural interfaces link the nervous system to internal or external devices – creating possibilities for bi-directional information exchange between different areas of the nervous system, thereby helping restore or supplement impaired neurological function. Commonly referred to as Brain Computer Interfacing (BCI), this technology can potentially help return lost motor and sensory function to individuals suffering from debilitating injuries to the nervous system.

A key component of BCIs are intracortical recording interfaces (IRIs), which record and conduct neural signals required to control an external assistive device such as a robotic arm. In reality, however, the robust foreign body response and blood-brain barrier breach triggered due to the prolonged presence of indwelling neural interfaces in brain tissue causes degradation of signal quality, and chronic device failure. Our work is focused on the design and development of novel coatings, and  non-invasive imaging strategies to help aid IRI implantation, and to prolong the chronic recording function of indwelling IRIs.

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Martha Betancur Joins the Lab

Martha Betancur joins the lab as a doctoral student! Welcome Martha.

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Dr. Karumbaiah is Awarded Seed Funding for TBI Research

Dr. Karumbaiah is awarded seed funding for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) research from the University of Georgia Athletic Department, and Regenerative Engineering in Medicine Center, Georgia Institute of Technology

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Karumbaiah Lab Opens its Doors!

10/1/2013 The Karumbaiah Lab has moved into a new lab in the ADS Complex at the University of Georgia.

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